Under His wings you will find refuge…You will not fear the terror of night.@Psalm 91:4–5
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John M. Neale (1818–1866)

An­a­to­li­us, prob­ab­ly 6th Cen­tu­ry (Τὴν ἡμέραν διελθὼν). Trans­lat­ed from Greek to Eng­lish by John M. Neale, Hymns of the East­ern Church, 1853.

Du Frie­dens­fürst, Herr Je­su Christ Bar­thol­o­ma­us Ges­i­us, 1601. Har­mo­ny by Jo­hann S. Bach, 1724 (🔊 pdf nwc).

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Johann S. Bach (1685–1750)

This li­ttle hymn, which, I be­lieve, is not used in the pub­lic ser­vice of the Church, is a great fa­vour­ite in the Greek Isles. Its pe­cul­iar style and ev­i­dent an­ti­qu­ity may well lead to the be­lief that it is the work of St. An­a­to­li­us. It is, to the scat­tered ham­lets of Ch­ios and Mi­ty­lene, what Bi­shop Ken’s ev­en­ing hymn is to the vi­llage of our land, and its mel­o­dy is sin­gu­lar­ly plain­tive and sooth­ing.

John Ma­son Neale

The day is past and over;
All thanks, O Lord, to Thee!
We pray Thee that offenseless
The hours of dark may be.
O Jesus, keep us in Thy sight,
And guard us through the coming night.

The joys of day are over;
We lift our hearts to Thee,
And call on Thee that sinless
The hours of dark may be.
O Jesus, make their darkness light,
And guard us through the coming night.

Lord, that in death I sleep not,
And lest my foe should say,
I have prevailed against him,
Lighten mine eyes, I pray:
O Jesus, keep me in Thy sight,
And guard me through the coming night.

The toils of day are over;
We raise our hymn to Thee,
And ask that free from peril
The hours of dark may be.
O Jesus, keep us in Thy sight,
And guard us through the coming night.

Be Thou our souls’ preserver,
O God, for Thou dost know
How many are the perils
Through which we have to go.
Lord Jesus Christ, O hear our call
And guard and save us from them all.