God has made that same Jesus…crucified, both Lord and Christ.@Acts 2:36
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John B. Dykes (1823-1876)

Albert W. T. Orsborn. The words are said to have been written for Good Friday meetings at the Clapton Congress Hall, London, around 1914. They are based partly on Osborn’s poem The Cross of Christ, published in The Field Officer, March 1912.

Melita John B. Dykes, in Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1861 (🔊 pdf nwc).

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Albert W. T. Orsborn (1886-1967)

We worship Thee, O Crucified!
What glories didst Thou lay aside;
What depth of human grief and sin
Didst Thou consent to languish in,
That through atoning blood outpoured
Our broken peace might be restored!

We mourn that e’er our hearts should be
One with a world that loves not Thee;
That with the crowd we passed Thee by,
And saw, but did not feel, Thee die.
Not till we knew our guilt and shame
Did we esteem our Savior’s name.

Though with our shame we shunned the light,
Thou didst not leave us in the night;
We were not left in sin to stray
Unsought, unloved, from Thee away;
For from Thy cross irradiates
A power that saves and recreates.

O loved above all earthly love,
To Thee our hearts adoring move;
Thy boundless mercies yearn to save
And in Thy blood sin’s wounds to lave.
O speed the day when men shall see
That human hopes are all in Thee.