Woman, why weepest thou?@John 20:15

Author unknown, probably from the Middle Ages (Pone Luctum, Magdalena). Translated from Latin to English by Herbert Kynaston, Occasional Hymns (London: R. Clay, Son, & Taylor, 1862), number 48.

Fides Clement C. Scholefield, in Church Hymns, 1874 (🔊 pdf nwc).

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Clement C. Scholefield (1839-1904)

Weep no more this holy morning,
Mary, put away thy fears;
In this feast there is no scorning,
No repentance for thy tears:
Joy, O joy, a thousand pleasures,
All thy soul’s recovered treasures—
Alleluia!—Christ appears.

Smile again, thou watcher weary,
Wreath thy lucid brow with bloom,
Death has fled, thou art not dreary,
Angels shine athwart the gloom;
Christ has freed the world from paining,
Lo, He comes, His life regaining—
Alleluia!—from the tomb.

Joy to thee, He soars ascending,
He who all thy sins forgave;
All thy sorrows now are ending,
Magdalene, He comes to save;
Whom thou soughtest lost and dying,
Welcome now with angels crying
Alleluia!—o’er His grave.

Mary, lift those brows declining,
Turn to see who stands behind,
See His face with glory shining,
See the pearly wounds enshrined,
Porches five, for all thy healing,
Life eternal each unsealing—
Alleluia!—to mankind.

Life in all His life’s resuming,
Mary, all thy light restore,
All thy heart with joy illuming,
Death is driven from the door:
Night has had his night of sorrow,
Joy returneth with the morrow—
Alleluia!—evermore.