The Lamb is the light thereof.@Revelation 21:23
portrait
Christian G. Neefe (1748-1798)

Samuel Rickards, Hymns for Private Devotion for the Sundays and Saints’ Days (London: Hatchards, 1825), pages 10-12. These words have been also been published in various centos.

Meiringen Christian G. Neefe, 1777 (🔊 pdf nwc).

Though rude winds usher thee, sweet day,
Though clouds thy face deform,
Though nature’s grace be swept away
Before thy sleety storm;
E’en in thy sombrest wintry vest,
Of blessèd days thou art most blest.

Not frigid air nor gloomy morn
Shall check our jubilee;
Bright is the day when Christ was born;
No sun need shine, but He:
Let roughest storms their coldest blow,
With love of Him our hearts shall glow.

Inspired with high and holy thought,
Fancy is on the wing;
It seems as to mine ear it brought
Those voices caroling,
Voices through Heav’n and earth that ran,
Glory to God, goodwill to man.

I see the shepherds gazing wild
At those fair spirits of light;
I see them bending o’er the Child
With that untold delight
Which marks the face who view
Things but too happy to be true.

There in the lowly manger laid
Incarnate God they see;
He stoops to take through spotless maid
Our frail humanity;
Son of high God, creation’s heir,
He leaves His Heaven to raise us here.

Through Him, O Lord, we’re born anew,
Thy children once again,
Oh,  day by day, our hearts renew,
That Thine we may remain,
And, angel-like, may all agree,
One sweet and holy family.

Oft as this joyous morn doth come
To speak our Savior’s love,
Oh, may it bear our spirits home
Where He now reigns above;
That day which brought Him from the skies
So man restores to paradise.

Then let winds usher thee, sweet day,
Let clouds thy face deform,
Though nature’s grace is swept away
Before thy sleety storm;
E’en i thy sombrest wintry vest,
Of blessèd days thou art most blest.