Praise ye the Lord from the heavens: praise Him in the heights.@Psalm 148:1
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John B. Dykes (1823-1876)

John H. Newman, The Dream of Gerontius, 1865. The editor of The Month: An Illustrated Magazine of Literature, Science and Art asked Newman if he could contribute something, and Newman submitted this poem. These lyrics appeared in hymnals shortly thereafter.

Gerontius John B. Dykes, in Hymns Ancient and Modern, 1868 (🔊 pdf nwc).

When William Ewart Gladstone, England’s Grand Old Man, lay dying in his home, he frequently quoted this hymn, finding in its noble sentiments a comforting solace in his last days. Canon Scott Holland in preaching at Saint Paul’s Cathedral pictured the dying prime minister as spending his life in benediction to those whom he leaves behind in this world and in thanksgiving to God, to whom he rehearses over and over, day after day, Newman’s hymn of austere and splendid adoration.

Price, p. 13

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John H. Newman (1801-1890)

Praise to the Holiest in the height,
And in the depth be praise;
In all His words most wonderful,
Most sure in all His ways.

O loving wisdom of our God!
When all was sin and shame,
A second Adam to the fight
And to the rescue came.

O wisest love! that flesh and blood,
Which did in Adam fail,
Should strive afresh against the foe,
Should strive and should prevail.

And that a higher gift than grace
Should flesh and blood refine,
God’s Presence and His very Self,
And Essence all divine.

O generous love! that He, who smote,
In Man for man the foe,
The double agony in Man
For man should undergo.

And in the garden secretly,
And on the cross on high,
Should teach His brethren, and inspire
To suffer and to die.

Praise to the Holiest in the height,
And in the depth be praise;
In all His words most wonderful,
Most sure in all His ways.