Two women shall be grinding at the mill; the one shall be taken, and the other left.@Matthew 24:41
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James A. Crutchfield (1840-1922)

James A. Crutchfield, 1906; cento from Crutchfield’s Miscellaneous Poems (Chicago, Illinois: 1906), pages 50-52.

Yorkshire John Wainright, 1750 (🔊 pdf nwc).

Two women shall be grinding at the mill,
Two men shall be at home on plain or hill;
Two women shall be working in the field,
Two men shall be in search of wealth concealed,
But one shall be of hope at last bereft—
One shall be taken and the other left.

Two boys be sleeping in the self-same bed,
On the same breast each leaned his baby head;
Two girls in social circles side by side,
Two girls in learning with each other vied;
But one has thought of Him whose side was cleft,
One shall be taken and the other left.

Two sweethearts shall be laughing by the way,
Two travelers meeting at the close of day;
Two figures at an altar, side by side,
One is a groom, the other, blushing bride;
But when the veil that hides is rent and reft,
One shall be taken and the other left.

Two lawyers shall be poring o’er a brief,
Two doctors seeking means to give relief;
Two faithful, trusted officers of state,
Two bankers at their desk—early and late;
But sin holds one by millstone weight and heft—
One shall be taken and the other left.

Two soldiers hear their country’s call and go,
Two tongues to tests of truth say yes, or no;
Two heads feel sun and rain which come to all;
Two souls shall hear God’s oft repeated call—
But when at last is wove life’s web and weft,
One shall be taken and the other left.