Look, the Lamb of God, who takes away the sin of the world!@John 1:29
portrait
Charlotte Elliott (1789-1871)

Charlotte Elliott, 1835. These words first appeared in The Christian Remembrancer, whose editor Elliott became in 1836. The last verse is from Elliott’s Hours of Sorrow Cheered and Comforted, 1836.

Miss Charlotte Elliott was visiting some friends in the West End of London, and there met the eminent minister, César Malan. While seated at supper, the minister said he hoped that she was a Christian. She took offense at this, and replied that she would rather not discuss that question. Dr. Malan said that he was sorry if had offended her, that he always liked to speak a word for his Master, and that he hoped that the young lady would some day become a worker for Christ. When they met again at the home of a mutual friend, three weeks later, Miss Elliott told the minister that ever since he had spoken to her she had been trying to find her Saviour, and that she now wished him to tell her how to come to Christ. Just come to him as you are, Dr. Malan said. This she did, and went away rejoicing. Shortly afterward she wrote this hymn.

Sankey, p. 186

About these words, her brother said: In the course of a long ministry, I hope I have been permitted to see some of the fruit of my labor, but I feel that far more has been done by a single hymn of my sister’s.

Evangelist Billy Graham said he was saved in 1934 in a revival meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina, led by Mordecai Ham, after hearing Just As I Am. This became an altar call song in the Billy Graham Crusades in the latter half of the 20th Century. Graham also used it in the title of his 1997 book, Just As I Am: The Autobiography of Billy Graham.

Woodworth, William B. Bradbury, Mendelssohn Collection, or Third Book of Psalmody (New York: 1849) ( pdf nwc).

portrait
William B. Bradbury (1816-1868)

Just as I am—without one plea,
But that Thy blood was shed for me,
And that Thou bidst me come to Thee—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—and waiting not
To rid my soul of one dark blot,
To Thee whose blood can cleanse each spot—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—though tossed about
With many a conflict, many a doubt,
Fightings and fears within, without—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—poor, wretched, blind;
Sight, riches, healing of the mind,
Yea, all I need in Thee to find—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—Thou wilt receive,
Wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve;
Because Thy promise I believe—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—Thy love unknown
Hath broken every barrier down;
Now, to be Thine, yea, Thine alone—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come.

Just as I am—of that free love
The breadth, length, depth, and height to prove,
Here for a season, then above—
O Lamb of God, I come, I come!