We must needs die, and are as water spilt on the ground, which cannot be gathered up again; neither doth God respect any person: yet doth He devise means, that His banished be not expelled from Him.@2 Samuel 14:14
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John B. Dykes (1823–1876)

Ben­ja­min Bed­dome (1717–1795).

St. Ag­nes John B. Dykes, in Hymn­al for Use in the Eng­lish Church, by John Grey, 1866 (🔊 pdf nwc).

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Benjamin Beddome (1717–1795)

One of his best hymns Mr. Bed­dome wrote af­ter re­cov­er­ing from a se­vere ill­ness. He had first writ­ten a hymn of gra­ti­tude for his res­tor­a­tion to health. On fur­ther re­flec­tion He wrote these lines.

Burrage, p. 51.

If I must die, O let me die
Trusting in Jesus’ blood!
That blood which hath atonement made,
And reconciles to God.

If I must die, then let me die
In peace with all mankind,
And change these fleeting joys below
For pleasures more refined.

If I must die, as die I must,
Let some kind seraph come,
And bear me on his friendly wing
To my celestial home!

Of Canaan’s land from Pisgah’s top
May I but have a view!
Though Jordan should o’erflow its banks,
I’ll boldly venture through.