The crowds that went ahead of Him and those that followed shouted, Hosanna to the Son of David! Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!@Matthew 21:9
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John M. Neale (1818-1866)

Theodulph of Orleans, circa 820 (Gloria laus et honor). Translated from Latin to English by John M. Neale, Mediæval Hymns and Sequences (London: Joseph Masters, 1851), number 22, as Glory and Honour, and Laud Be to Thee, King Christ the Redeemer. Translated by Neale a second time in The Hymnal Noted, 1854. In 1859, the compilers of Hymns Ancient Modern made alterations, with Neale’s agreement, resulting in the text below.

St. Theodulph Melchior Teschner, in Ein andächtiges Gebet (Leipzig, Germany: 1615) (🔊 pdf nwc). Bach used this chorale in his St. John’s Passion. William H. Monk wrote the harmony in 1861.

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All glory, laud and honor,
To Thee, Redeemer, King,
To whom the lips of children
Made sweet hosannas ring.

Thou art the king of Israel,
Thou David’s royal Son,
Who in the Lord’s name comest,
The King and Blessèd One.

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The company of angels
Are praising Thee on High,
And mortal men and all things
Created make reply.

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The people of the Hebrews
With palms before Thee went;
Our prayer and praise and anthems
Before Thee we present.

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To Thee, before Thy passion,
They sang their hymns of praise;
To Thee, now high exalted,
Our melody we raise.

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Thou didst accept their praises;
Accept the prayers we bring,
Who in all good delightest,
Thou good and gracious King.

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Thy sorrow and Thy triumph
Grant us, O Christ, to share,
That to the holy city
Together we may fare.

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For homage may we bring Thee
Our victory o’er the foe,
That in the Conqueror’s triumph
This strain may ever flow.

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